Topology Optimization: Not Just Throwing Parameters at the Wall

Location: 
Mann Engineer Student Center - Room 107 (located in Dunham Lab – 10 Hillhouse Ave) See map
10 Hillhouse Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511

Solid State & Optics Seminar Series

sponsored by “The Flint Fund Series on Quantum Devices and Nanostructures”

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

1:00pm

Mann Engineer Student Center - Room 107

(located in Dunham Lab – 10 Hillhouse Ave)

Dr. Rasmus Christiansen

DTU (Technical University of Denmark)

Topology Optimization: Not Just Throwing Parameters at the Wall

The rigorous engineering of physical systems to serve a given purpose, such as carefully designing the load carrying members in an airplane or the optical components in a microscope, is a cornerstone in the improvement and development of new devices and the advancement of science.  Present day engineering tools often rely on analytical design rules, parameter studies and human intuition, all of which have their limitations. Applying such tools might therefore result in sub-optimal design solutions leaving room for improvement. Further, they make it difficult to tackle certain classes of problems. Meanwhile, the ongoing advances in mathematical modelling and the growth in computational power have facilitated the development of powerful design tools, such as topology optimization, providing unprecedented freedom to explore and exploit the vast design spaces available for a multitude of physical problems.  This talk will present a range of engineering solutions created using topology optimization, with a focus on wave propagation problems; provide a brief introduction to structural optimization and a detailed discussion of density based topology optimization. Recent results of using topology optimization to solve design problems considering plasmonic field localization, enhanced Raman scattering and photonic cavity design will be discussed.

•            Design of Electromagnetic Systems

•            Density Based Topology Optimization

•            PDE-constrained Optimization

•            Solid Mechanics

PROFESSIONAL BIO:

Name: Rasmus Ellebæk Christiansen

Rasmus holds a BSc in Physics and Nanotechnology (2011), a MSc in Computational Mathematics (2013) and a PhD-degree (2016) from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). His PhD-fellowship was focused on the development, application and experimental validation of topology optimization based methods for solving wave propagation based design problems in acoustics and photonics.  He currently works as a Postdoctoral researcher at DTU, where he have been involved in several projects, among which are the SunTune project and the NATEC project. The SunTune project is centered at Aarhus University and concerns the design of passive solar cell components. The NATEC project is centered at the Department of Photonics at DTU and is focused on the design of active and passive photonic structures for applications in optical data processing and terabit communication.  Currently, he is visiting the Department of Mathematics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) as a short term scholar, where he works with Professor Steven G. Johnsons group on light matter interaction problems, treating phenomena such as Raman and Cherenkov scattering as well as the design of optical metasurfaces.

Hosted by Prof. Owen Miller

Applied Physics

Yale University

Solid State & Optics Seminar Series

sponsored by “The Flint Fund Series on Quantum Devices and Nanostructures”

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

1:00pm

Mann Engineer Student Center - Room 107

(located in Dunham Lab – 10 Hillhouse Ave)

Dr. Rasmus Christiansen

DTU (Technical University of Denmark)

Topology Optimization: Not Just Throwing Parameters at the Wall

The rigorous engineering of physical systems to serve a given purpose, such as carefully designing the load carrying members in an airplane or the optical components in a microscope, is a cornerstone in the improvement and development of new devices and the advancement of science.  Present day engineering tools often rely on analytical design rules, parameter studies and human intuition, all of which have their limitations. Applying such tools might therefore result in sub-optimal design solutions leaving room for improvement. Further, they make it difficult to tackle certain classes of problems. Meanwhile, the ongoing advances in mathematical modelling and the growth in computational power have facilitated the development of powerful design tools, such as topology optimization, providing unprecedented freedom to explore and exploit the vast design spaces available for a multitude of physical problems.  This talk will present a range of engineering solutions created using topology optimization, with a focus on wave propagation problems; provide a brief introduction to structural optimization and a detailed discussion of density based topology optimization. Recent results of using topology optimization to solve design problems considering plasmonic field localization, enhanced Raman scattering and photonic cavity design will be discussed.

•            Design of Electromagnetic Systems

•            Density Based Topology Optimization

•            PDE-constrained Optimization

•            Solid Mechanics

PROFESSIONAL BIO:

Name: Rasmus Ellebæk Christiansen

Rasmus holds a BSc in Physics and Nanotechnology (2011), a MSc in Computational Mathematics (2013) and a PhD-degree (2016) from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). His PhD-fellowship was focused on the development, application and experimental validation of topology optimization based methods for solving wave propagation based design problems in acoustics and photonics.  He currently works as a Postdoctoral researcher at DTU, where he have been involved in several projects, among which are the SunTune project and the NATEC project. The SunTune project is centered at Aarhus University and concerns the design of passive solar cell components. The NATEC project is centered at the Department of Photonics at DTU and is focused on the design of active and passive photonic structures for applications in optical data processing and terabit communication.  Currently, he is visiting the Department of Mathematics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) as a short term scholar, where he works with Professor Steven G. Johnsons group on light matter interaction problems, treating phenomena such as Raman and Cherenkov scattering as well as the design of optical metasurfaces.

Hosted by Prof. Owen Miller

Applied Physics

Yale University

Event time: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - 1:00pm
Sponsor: 
The Flint Fund Series on Quantum Devices and Nanostructures”
Presented By: 
Dr. Rasmus Christiansen
Department: 
DTU (Technical University of Denmark)
Hosted By: 
Prof. Owen Miller