• Physics of Novel Materials

    Research is conducted by several Applied Physics faculty, in collaboration with faculty from other SEAS and Yale departments.

  • Optical Physics & Devices

    A planar realization of a random laser that is pumped with incoherent light from the top and emits coherent light in random directions.

  • Quantum Information & Devices

    Systems that employ quantum effects to process information or detect electromagnetic radiation at the ultimate physical limits.

Welcome

Welcome to Applied Physics at Yale

The Department of Applied Physics prepares students for academic and industrial careers at the forefront of science and technology. Teaching and research are focused on fundamental issues in condensed matter and optical physics and on the practical application of these concepts and techniques to technology. This balance between fundamental science and application makes our program highly interdisciplinary, having strong collaborations with Physics and Chemistry, as well as Electrical, Mechanical, Chemical, and Biomedical Engineering.

Explore the exciting opportunities in the Department of Applied Physics from this short video.

Recent News

AP Alumni Spotlight: Archana Kamal, Ph.D.'10 receives AFOSR Young Investigator and NSF-CAREER awards
  • Anchana Kamal (Yale Ph.D.’10, a former graduate student with QLab - Devoret Group) has been recognized with two prestigious honors: Young Investigator Program award by Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and CAREER award by National Science Foundation. Congratulations to Anchana!

The Route to Robust Quantum Computing: Interview with Shruti Puri
  • By Liang Dong, PhD

    Quantum computing is a radically new way to store and process information based on the principles of quantum mechanics. While conventional computers store information in binary “bits” that are either 0s or 1s, quantum computers store information in quantum bits, or qubits. A qubit can be both 0 and 1 at the same time, and a series of qubits together remember many different things simultaneously.

Hui Cao on the Science Podcast: The world’s fastest random number generator
  • Sarah Crespi talks with Hui Cao, a professor of applied physics at Yale University, about a new way to generate enormous streams of random numbers faster than ever before, using a tiny laser that can fit on a computer chip.

Random numbers faster, from a laser
  • Random numbers are increasingly important to our digitally connected world, with applications that include e-commerce, cryptography, and cloud computing. Producing a large amount of truly random numbers quickly, though, is a challenge.

    To speed things up, a team of researchers has developed a compact laser that can produce these random numbers 100 times quicker than the fastest current systems. The results are published February 26 in the journal Science.

A spintronics success story
  • Yale researchers working with scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory have demonstrated the ability to control spin dynamics in magnetic materials by altering the materials’ thickness. The research stands as a major achievement in the emerging field of spintronics — the manipulation of electron spin — and could prove useful in developing the next generation of electronics.

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Yale Applied Physics Graduate Studies Program

If you are interested in one of the following research areas, the Yale Applied Physics Department is the place for you:

Graduate student support and requirements include:

  • Full fellowship support for first year
  • Two semesters of special investigations research during first year
  • One semester as teaching fellow during second year
  • Dissertation Area Exam in lieu of Qualifying Exam

Click here to apply.

For more information, click on the image.
Applied Physics Studies Program Brochure

 

Yale Applied Physics Undergraduate Major

The Yale Applied Physics major is an intensive physics major offering a unique combination of depth and flexibility: 

  • The student chooses an area of science in which they have a special interest. 
  • A faculty advisor is selected from Applied Physics, Physics, Engineering, the Medical School, or other departments who will supervise the research. 
  • Three elective courses are chosen that are related to the research. 
  • The student thus graduates with a solid background in their area of interest, well prepared for graduate school, industry, etc.

Click here for more information.  

Click on the image below for the Applied Physics Undergraduate program brochure.
Applied Physics Undergraduate Program Brochure